2019 CSCE Annual Conference - Laval (Greater Montreal)

2019 CSCE Annual Conference - Laval (Greater Montreal) Conference


Title
Finite Element Analysis of Ultra-High performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete Panel Subjected to Blast Loading


Author(s)
Mr. Mohtady Sherif, Ryerson University (Presenter)
Ms. Hesham Othman, Ryerson University
Dr. Hesham Marzouk, Ryerson University
Abstract

Several investigations have shown that the mechanical properties of ultra-high performance fibre reinforced concrete (UHP-FRC) material and the strain rate effects are different from traditional concrete. These differences in material behavior might result in more complexity to the finite element (FE) simulation of UHP-FRC under extreme loading conditions (e.g., impact, blast). This paper presents a numerical investigation on the performance of reinforced UHP-FRC panels under blast loading with a concrete material model which takes into account the contribution of tensile hardening response and strain rate effect. Fracture energy and crack-band width approaches are combined to accurately represent the tensile behaviour and guarantee mesh independent of results. The numerical simulation has been performed using ABAQUS/Explicit. The complete behavior of UHP-FRC is defined using concrete damage plasticity model. The performance of the numerical models is verified by comparing numerical results to the experimental data. Brief description of experiment required for the validation is provided. Each input parameter of UHP-FRC is investigated in order to establish a precise numerical method for blast analysis and identify the significance of various effects on the numerical results. Thereafter, parametric studies using calibrated model are also carried out to investigate the effect of steel reinforcement and the plate thickness in increasing UHPFRC resistance to blast loading.

The numerical results demonstrate the feasibility of existing concrete damage plasticity constitutive model for analyzing UHP-FRC under high dynamic loading rates. Computed responses are sensitive to parameters related to the tension, fracture energy, strain rate effect, plastic expansion, and damage parameters.