2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities

2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities Conference


Title
Capacity of hybrid reinforced UHPC beams in flexure and shear


Author(s)
Mr. Alameer Alameer, University of Ottawa (Presenter)
Dr. Murat Saatcioglu, University of Ottawa
Abstract

Capacity of hybrid reinforced UHPC beams in flexure and shear

Alameer Alameer *, Husham Almansour** and Murat Saatcioglu*

*Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

** Associate Research Officer, Nationar Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

*Distingushed University Professor & Research Chair, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

(Corresponding author: Mr. A. Alameer)

Ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) has superior mechanical properties in addition to its superior corrosion resistance. However, the high initial cost of material prohibits widespread use and production worldwide. Optimization of structural elements that minimizes material use while maximizing their potential capacities would lead to an attractive initial cost and improve their life-cycle attractiveness. This will result in wider acceptance of the material by infrastructure owners as an efficient alternative in their future projects. Such an optimization would require the use of hybrid reinforcement, which involves steel fibers, rebars and prestressing steel tendons.

The objective of this paper is to evaluate the flexural and shear capacities of hybrid reinforced prestressed beams with the increase of the shear reinforcement (or the stirrups).

In this study, a nonlinear elasto-plastic two-dimensional finite element model (FEM) has been developed to simulate the structural behaviour up to failure. The ultimate flexural and shear strengths, as well as the resulting design are compared to the French (AFGC, 2002) and Japanese (JSCE. 2006) recommendations for simplified analysis and design. Several loading and reinforcement arrangements have been studied with detailed investigation of the stress distributions, crack patterns, stresses in prestressing tendons, and development of failure states.