2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities

2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities Conference


Title
Quantitative Assessment of Residential and Non-residential Solid Waste Generation in Alberta and British Columbia

Return to Session

Author(s)
Ms. Aklima Zerin Asha, University of Regina (Presenter)
Dr. Kelvin T. W. Ng, University of Regina
Abstract

Alberta and British Columbia were selected in this study to investigate the solid waste generation characteristics in Western Canada. Waste data from 1998 to 2010 were collected from Statistics Canada. It was found that non-residential waste generation was noticeably higher than residential waste generation during the study period. On average, the residential waste in Alberta and British Columbia represented about 34% and 40% of their total non-hazardous waste generation, respectively.

Per-capita rates were used in the study to minimize the impact of differences in population growth rates. During the study period, the average total waste generation rates in Alberta and British Columbia were 3.23 kg/capita?day and 2.47 kg/capita?day, respectively. The percentage difference of these rates was about 26.7%. On the other hand, the average residential waste generation rates were similar in the provinces, with 0.97 kg/capita?day and 0.91 kg/capita?day in Alberta and British Columbia, respectively. The percentage difference between the provinces was much smaller (about 6.4%) in this case. The results suggested that non-residential wastes coming from the institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors might be responsible for the higher per-capita total waste generation rates in Alberta. Socio-economic factors affecting generation rates were also considered in the study. Family income and educational attainment were positively related to the residential waste generation in the provinces. On the contrary, no significant correlation was observed between generation of non-residential wastes and economic performance factors (gross domestic products, and agricultural cash receipts).