2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities

2015 CSCE Annual Conference Regina - Building on our Growth Opportunities Conference


Title
Team Gushue Highway extension using Techspan Concrete arch for river crossing.


Author(s)
Mr. Thomas Brunet, Reinforced Earth Company Ltd. (Presenter)
Mr. Bill Demers, Reinforced Earth Company Ltd.
Abstract

~Team Gushue Highway Extension
St. John’s NL
This paper will outline the Newfoundland and Labrador Ministry of Transportation and Works project, of a
TechSpan concrete arch culvert, constructed over the Waterford River to support a 19 m high embankment for
the Team Gushue Highway Extension.
Named in honor the 2006 Olympic Gold medalist curling team, The Team Gushue highway once completed
will provide a vital link to the NW Avalon Peninsula. The highway is designed to relieve traffic congestion on
all major routes in the region, and when finished, will connect the Outer Ring Road in the north with Robert E.
Howlett Memorial Drive to the south.
The Waterford river crossing was a major technical and construction challenge on this project. The 10 m wide
river runs in a 19 m deep meandering gorge and has a swift current, making work in and around the river
challenging. Access to the site was extremely difficult. Two very steep grade construction roads on each side of
the river connected by a temporary bridge provided access to the bottom of the gorge and the erection site. A
temporary diversion of the river permitted for excavation and site casting of two 5.35 m wide footings and the
erection of the concrete arch culvert in the dry. The 63m long, 11m span, 4m high concrete arch structure
supports 19 m of overburden and the highway road base, allowing the highway a level crossing of the gorge and
river.
This paper highlights the purpose of this significant new work, the creek sensitivity and diversion, and the
design and construction of an arch structure supporting hydraulics and very high overburden. Also reviewed
are the construction costs and schedule, and the long term maintenance compared to a bridge deck.